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We are self-supported missioners – we’ve rented our home and our Roton Point unit - and we’ve lived with the local people in Kenya for the past thirteen summers. We’ve spent time with young people that we, and many of our friends and family members, have helped to go to school. It is our hope that these graduates will get good jobs - and that they will in turn help to raise other at-risk children out of their poverty.

During our three months there in 2017, we visited the 350 primary school students in Nambale Magnet School, which is supported by Noroton Presbyterian Church in Darien, CT, as well as the 45 primary and secondary students in thirteen schools in the Kitale area, who are being sponsored by parishioners of St. John Church, also in Darien, CT.

We also spent time with a young woman who had just finished college, one girl in primary school, two students in secondary schools and a young man who is trained as an electrician and is looking for work - all of whom were in the Chemichemi program of Ripples International in Meru.

And we visited five Masai girls - one in Bissel Primary School, two in secondary schools and two at Threads of Hope Sewing School near Masai Mara.

There are 22 new photos, which were taken in Kenya in the Kiambio slum of Nairobi, and in Meru, Bissil, Narok, Nambale, Kitale and Samburu Reserve.

And there are also some photos taken in the places we visited on our way home from Kenya - Phnom Penh and Angkor Wat in Cambodia and Ha Long Bay in Viet Nam.

Your purchase of these photos and note cards will help to provide porridge for 91 Rossholme preschoolers in Kiambio slum in Nairobi.




Scroll down to see all photos.
Click on thumbnails to see larger images and stories behind the photos.


Mama Martha  Mama Saab  Thoroughly Modern Masai  Mama Solopian  Mama Mercy 

 "We are Rossholme Kids"    "We Love Playing Games"   Lunchtime   Three Generations 

Hula Hoops are Fun  Soccer in the Hallway  On the Street of in School  Water for My Sister  Big Sisters 

Samburu Hills   The Hero   On School Break  Sunset over the Ewaso  

The Oldest Hotel   The Grandest Monument   The Old and The New   Serene Waters  

 "He   Lots of Wildlife    "Where    "You  

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Click on thumbnails to see larger images and stories behind the photos.

Images copyright © 2017 and 2018 by Marilyn Parker. All rights reserved.























Mama Martha

Mama Martha

She lives on a shamba in a semi-arid region, and grows field peas and keeps some goats. Her daughter, who just finished primary school, looks after a few geese. Their lives are tough, but much better now than they were when they lived in town, where was no space to grow food and to keep any animals.












Mama Saab

Mama Saab

She is Masai and does not know English - and she is very proud of her daughter who is in her third year in high school. Her life isn’t easy; however she loves making and adorning herself with beautiful jewelry, which makes her feel beautiful.















Thoroughly Modern Masai

Thoroughly Modern Masai

She learned how to sew at Threads of Hope, which is located near Masai Mara. And she loves sewing dresses for herself. She didn’t get high grades in primary school, but she has found something that she excels at - and which will help her with her own dressmaking business.












Mama Solopian

Mama Solopian

Her sixteen year old daughter, who has a baby, wants to go back to school. So this young grandmother will now be a mother again. She hopes though, that having her daughter stay in school awhile longer will help her to learn some skills that will enable her to take care of herself and her child.












Mama Mercy

Mama Mercy

She is a single mum with four children and they live in a small wooden house with a dirt floor. They use a solar lamp for light, and they pray for rain so they can harvest it from their corrugated metal roof. When it doesn’t rain, they have to get water from the community well, which is several miles away.




















 "We are Rossholme Kids"

"We are Rossholme Kids"


They live in the Kiambio slum of Nairobi, and they love going to Rossholme Education Centre. Every morning they start their day off right with a cup of ugali and then they sing and look at story books and learn to speak English.




















 "We Love Playing Games"

"We Love Playing Games"


Sports Day at Nambale Magnet School in Western Kenya was filled with lots of energy. The 350 students were assigned to one of four teams, each with an animal name, and they competed to determine who would be “King”.



















Lunchtime

Lunchtime


While the students at Tartar Primary School have their lunch of beans and maize, the neighbor’s goats come hoping for something better than grass to eat.



















Three Generations

Three Generations


This young boy’s family includes his sister’s son and his aunt. They struggle together, and hope there’ll be rain for potatoes, beans and maize to grow, and that they’ll be able to harvest enough food to eat ‘til the next season.














Hula Hoops are Fun

Hula Hoops are Fun

Malaria is transmitted by mosquitoes, and so mosquito nets are hung over all the beds in the dormitories at Nambale Magnet School in Western Kenya. But the young girls there are inventive, and so the hoops that hold the mesh nets up have become things to play with.













Soccer in the Hallway

Soccer in the Hallway

The preschoolers at Rossholme Education Centre in the Kiambio slum of Nairobi walk for an hour every Friday afternoon to the nearest playing field. And during their class breaks on the other four days of the week, the only space they have to play soccer in is the narrow and dimly lite hallway.




















On the Street or in School

On the Street or in School


Often children in Kiambio slum don’t go to school, even though there is a school just around the corner. When their parents can’t pay for school fees and uniforms, girls and boys are left on their own to find ways to amuse themselves on the streets and in the alleys. They could instead be learning something that will help them to support themselves later on in life.














Water for My Sister

Water for My Sister


This brother gives a cup of fresh, pure water, which he got from the well, to his young sister. They are out in the yard while their mother is inside at a meeting with teachers at St. John Bosco Children’s Centre. These children live in a slum area in Kitale, and the water there needs to be boiled to be safe to drink. Often though there is no way to do that.














Big Sisters

Big Sisters


It was Parents’ Day at St. John Bosco Children Centre in Kitale, and their mothers were meeting with the teachers. These young girls, who live at the Centre during the week and attend a day school, were substitute mothers for their little siblings. If they weren’t sponsored in schools, they would be doing this every day.













Samburu Hills

Samburu Hills


Samburu Reserve is not a National Wildlife Park as it belongs to the Samburu people who live there. Even though it is hot and dry most of the year, many animals thrive there.




















The Hero

The Hero

Buffalo Springs National Reserve is dry country with acacia scrub and rocky slopes. The Hero, a huge mountain looming in the distance, near Archer’s Post, is a welcome landmark for many local people who walk through this harsh area.




















On School Break

On School Break



The Samburu people are pastoralists, and often only one child goes to school. And it could be a girl as boys are needed to mind the goats. When girls are not in school they also herd animals.













Sunset over the Ewaso

Sunset over the Ewaso

The Ewaso Nyiro starts in the Aberderes and provides water for elephants and other large animals in Samburu National Reserve. Its name means muddy or brown water because it carries with it rich top soil from the Laikipia Plateau.



















The Oldest Hotel

The Oldest Hotel


Phnom Penh, in Cambodia, is a mixture of old and new. There are old buildings that date back to the 1800s when the French were there - and now there are lots of motor bikes, cell phones and trendy coffee places for the young, modern people.




















The Grandest Monument

The Grandest Monument


Angkor Wat, in Cambodia, is a UN Historic Site, and until 100 years ago, was unknown. A million people lived there in the 12th century, and 100,000 of them worked for 30 years, with 40,000 elephants, to build the many temples with huge stones.



















The Old and The New

The Old and The New


Hanoi, in Viet Nam, has some of its traditional buildings and culture - and a lot of new multi-story structures. The lake in the centre of town provides a quiet oasis from the busy traffic on the streets surrounding it.




















Serene Waters

Serene Waters


There are 2000 mountain islands Ha Long Bay in Viet Nam - and the movie “Indochine” made them famous. The local fisher people have lived there on their boats for many years. These days however, there are far too many cruise boats disturbing the tranquility of this beautiful area.





















 "He

"He's a Grevy's Zebra"


He has narrower stripes than the plains or common zebra - and a white belly and round bear-like ears. He is one of the world’s largest wild equids, and he moves about in a small herd. There are around 1500 to 2000 Grevy’s in the Samburu National Reserve, which is dry and hot country most of the year.















Lots of Wildlife

Lots of Wildlife


Samburu Reserve is in a semi-arid region of Northern Kenya, and most of the year it is hot and dry. It looks like there is nothing for the animals to eat except dry grass and bushes, but there are many animals - zebras, oryx, gazelles, impalas, gerenuks, lions, cheetahs, leopards, elephants, giraffes - even a few Kudu, the most elusive of all the antelopes.








 "Where

"Where's my Lunch?"


He’s been lying quietly on a branch high up in the canopy of a big old tree. And now he’s hungry. He’s looking for young gazelle or impala that is close by and unaware of his presence. He will stalk silently through the vegetation and then, at the last possible moment, he’ll emerge and pounce on his prey and strangle it with his powerful jaws.














 "You

"You're in my Way"

It’s early in the morning and his whole extended family is heading to the river for a drink. And we had stopped on their path. All the others in the herd steered clear of us, except this frisky youngster at the end of the line. He made it clear that we were blocking him, and he even butted the back of our vehicle.